Skip to main content

Menu

Login

Explore more of Isaaffik

IDDO Greenland test of the Rapid Air Movement (RAM) drill

General

Organisation
Project start
01.01.2018
Project end
31.12.2019
Type of project
ARMAP/NSF
Project theme
Instrument Development
Project topic
Geology
Instrument Development

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 67.0179977417, -50.69400024414

Fieldwork start
17.07.2018
Fieldwork end
02.08.2018

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland Ice Sheet
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 66.4879, -46.281

Fieldwork start
20.07.2018
Fieldwork end
31.07.2018

SAR information

Project details

02.09.2019
Science / project plan

.

Science / project summary
This project contributes to the joint initiative launched by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.K. Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to substantially improve decadal and longer-term projections of ice loss and sea-level rise originating from Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica. The researchers will use precision GPS, seismic, and radar instrumentation to collect new data on the current behavior and future evolution of the side margins of Thwaites Glacier. These new data will help improve computer models used to predict the future contribution of the West Antarctic ice sheet to global sea level changes. A new RAM drill was developed to replace an older RAM drill utilizing input from the research community. It uses high velocity air drives to rotate cutters and blows the firn directly out of the borehole, so no cores are recovered. The purpose of the drill is to create multiple boreholes quickly, that are large enough to deploy seismic instruments in an array. The new drill will be lighter and more easily transported. The drill is planned to be tested in Greenland at Raven Camp, a site that has similar characteristics to the snow conditions expected at Thwaites, so the concept can be proven in the field and modifications can be incorporated, if necessary, prior to deploying to Antarctica in late 2018 for use during the 2019/2020 Antarctic field season.
Close